Canadian Banknotes are fascinating! – $10

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Canadian banknotes can be truly fascinating!

 

While going through my wallet, I found a new $10 banknote that is currently in circulation. The ten dollar bill (polymer series) once again features some of Canadian pride and one of the most prominent politicians in Canadian history.

 

Front Side – Sir John Alexander Macdonald:

 

Canadian Banknotes

Canadian Banknotes

Sir John Alexander Macdonald was the very first Canadian Prime Minister and served for a number of terms (1867–1873, 1878–1891). After his family immigrated to Canada from Scotland, he became a lawyer and shortly after got involved in politics slowly rising to the top of the political scene. His actions helped shape Canada as we know today.

 

Notable achievements and interesting facts:

 

 

  • Dominion of Canada came to existence on July 1st, 1867. Same day, Sir John Alexander Macdonald was knighted (hence “Sir”) and appointed the Prime Minister of newly formed government.
  • Shortly after, the very first general elections were held in Canada. Interestingly enough, back then no secret ballots were used and votes were made public.
  • Under his rule, Trans Canadian Railway slowly came into existence and was completed after years of planning and design. The entire project was extremely expensive for such small nation, and required heavy borrowing, negotiations, and compromising. Few times the project almost went bankrupt – but it was finally completed on  November 7th, 1885.
  • Mount Macdonald at Rogers Pass, Ottawa Macdonald-Cartier International Airport, and Ontario Highway 401 (the Macdonald-Cartier Freeway) are all named after him.
  • John Alexander Macdonald was known to be quite a drinker – to the point his drinking would sometimes get in the way of politics.
  • John’s first wife Isabella Macdonald was John’s first cousin. Apparently cousin marriage was no big deal back in the day.

 

Famous quote of Sir John A. Macdonald (one of many):

 

“Let us be English or let us be French… but above all let us be Canadians.”

 

Back Side – The Canadian:

 

 

Canadian Banknotes

Canadian Banknotes

 

Back side of the bill features The Canadian train winding through Rockies as a tribute to Sir John Macdonald as the main driving force behind Trans Canadian Railway.

 

Interesting facts and information:

 

– British Columbia joined Canada in 1871 with the promise that it will be included in Trans Canadian railway project. People of BC were also given large sums of money as part of the deal to repay their debts.

– Overall cost of the project was estimated around $100,000,000 which was a monstrous amount of money in that time.

– The project caused First Nations rebellion in Manitoba against Canadian government which lasted 6 months but ended after Canadian troops were brought in.

– The railway was completed in on Nov. 7th, 1885 in Craigellachie, BC (area between Sicamous and Revelstoke). First train arrived at Port Moody from Montreal on July 4th, 1886.

– Port Moody was originally the final destination for the railway on the west coast. But by 1886, the Canadian Pacific Railway Company had decided to extend the line further to the West to Vancouver after local businessmen promised to fund the extension for their own benefit.

– Ride between Montreal and Port Moody was five days and nineteen hours long.

 

Canadian Banknotes

Canadian Banknotes

 

Interesting Banknotes Around the World

Let’s take a look at some of the world’s most interesting banknotes

 

Last week I looked at Canadian banknotes and how interesting they can be. But other nations’ money can provide some entertainment too!

 

Israel

 

Israeli lira from 1968 featured a portrait of Albert Einstein. You can still buy it on eBay for roughly $10 if you happen to be a big fan of his. Not many people know it, but Albert Einstein was offered Israeli presidency back in 1952 but turned it down.

Interesting Banknotes

Interesting Banknotes

 

Serbia

 

Serbian dinar also features a man of science – Nicola Tesla himself. The back side features a picture of electro-magnetic induction engine.

 

Interesting Banknotes

Interesting Banknotes

 

 

 Turkey

 

Turkey went all math instead of physics. Their banknotes have a portrait of Cahit Arf – Turkish mathematician. While I consider myself fairly knowledgeable in math, I couldn’t even being to understand which part of mathematics he’s famous for.

 

Interesting Banknotes

Interesting Banknotes

 

Canada

 

Did you know that Canada used to have a 4-dollar banknote? They date back to early 1900, and were withdrawn from circulation shortly after.

 

Interesting Banknotes

Interesting Banknotes

 

 

Zimbabwe

 

Zimbabwe went through a brutal cycle of hyperinflation – money was being printed with no regard to state of economy. More money flooded the market, and prices kept rising to no end. The banknotes issued risen in denomination. Below is a banknote for one hundred trillion dollars – probably just enough to fill up your car with gas!

 

Interesting Banknotes

Interesting Banknotes

 

Congo

 

Democratic Republic of Congo used to be known as Zaire. Joseph Mobutu ruled the country until he was overthrown in 1997. Instead of producing brand new money, new govt decided to punch holes in old money to get rid of his face – that resulted in producing banknotes with holes in them. I guess he wasn’t very popular, and everybody was sick of his face.

 

Interesting Banknotes

Interesting Banknotes

 

 

Canadian Banknotes are fascinating! – $50

Canadian banknotes can be truly fascinating!

 

Personally, I think Canadian banknotes are truly unique. Especially the latest series – so-called “polymer series”. Being basically plastic, they’re designed to be extra durable – and thus saving money on printing and replacing (God knows they’re printing enough money already). They also have a myriad of security features paper money didn’t have – holographic elements, transparent windows, raised characters, hidden numbers.

I especially like certain elements of Canadian pride shown on our money. Have you ever wondered who are the people pictured on our money? Even pictures on back sides are connected to Canadian history. Why are they shown there?

I had nothing to do this Sunday, so I’ve looked up some information on Canadian banknotes and imagery on them. So, next time you’re trying to make small talk with a good-looking cashier when grocery shopping, feel free to pass on this information.

 

Front Side – William Lyon Mackenzie King:

 

Canadian Banknotes

Canadian Banknotes

William Lyon Mackenzie King was a political figure in Canada from 1920’s and well into 1940’s. He served as a Prime Minster of Canada on multiple occasions, and some of his achievements can still be enjoyed today by everyday Canadians.

 

Notable achievements and interesting facts:

 

  • William Lyon Mackenzie King was the longest serving Prime Minister of Canada – he ruled Canada for over 22 years .
  • He wasn’t very popular with voters (despite being elected a number of times) and would probably never get elected if he was alive today, but he was a true diplomat and had a talent for striking alliances.
  • Mackenzie King had five university degrees (his student loans must have been huge!)
  • His government created Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC) in 1936
  •  Trans-Canadian Airlines (now knows as Air Canada) was also created under his rule in 1937
  • He transformed Bank of Canada into a crown corporation in 1938 (before that it used to be a private entity)
  • William Lyon Mackenzie King is rated #1 (or the Greatest Prime Minister) by a survey of Canadian historians

 

Famous quote of William Lyon Mackenzie King (one of many):

 

“A true man does not only stand up for himself, he stands up for those that do not have the ability to”.

 

Back Side – CCGS Amundsen:

 

Canadian Banknotes

Canadian Banknotes

 

CCGS Amundsen is an Arctic icebreaker and research vessel operated by Canadian Coast Guard. Originally known as CCGS Sir John Franklin, this icebreaker was built in 1979 in North Vancouver. After serving for a number of years, it was decommissioned after it was deemed surplus (fancy term for “useless”  or “not needed”).

In 2003, CCGS Sir John Franklin got a new lease on life after universities around Canada decided to pool the money together, and retrofit the icebreaker to use it as a research vessel. It was to be operated by Canadian Coast Guard half the time – so in reality the icebreaker is shared by scientists and Canadian Coast Guard – kind of like how roommates buy a flat screen TV together so everyone can enjoy it at scheduled times. This was the moment when the name was changed to CCGS Amundsen (in honor of Arctic explorer Roald Amundsen).

 

Interesting facts and information:

 

– CCGS stands for “Canadian Coast Guard Ship”.

– Roald Engelbregt Gravning Amundsen (after whom the icebreaker is named) discovered South Pole in 1911 and was the first one to reach North Pole in 1926. He disappeared during a rescue mission in 1928 and his body has never been found.

– CCGS Amundsen is powered by 6 diesel engines – 18,000 horse power combined! That is roughly equal to 130 Honda Civics.

– The ship has enough room for 80 people (40 being the crew) and a small helicopter

– She can crash 1 meter thick ice and travel  up to 15,000 nautical miles

 

Canadian Banknotes

Canadian Banknotes